Last edited by Shaktirr
Thursday, October 8, 2020 | History

6 edition of Medieval Reliquary Shrines found in the catalog.

Medieval Reliquary Shrines

Conservation of Medieval Precious Metalwork

by Kilian Anheuser

  • 301 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Archetype Books .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Conservation, restoration & care of artworks,
  • History - Medieval,
  • Art / History / Medieval,
  • Art,
  • Art & Art Instruction

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages144
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL12292735M
    ISBN 101904982182
    ISBN 109781904982180

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. A miniature shrine, also referred to in literature as a portable shrine, pocket shrine, or a travel altar, is a small, generally moveable shrine or altar. They vary greatly in size and architectural style, and by which region or culture produced them. This shrine was made in the 12th century to enclose the 8th-century Gospel Book known as the Book of Dimma (TCD MS 59; see previous post) but, like many book-shrines, it was significantly altered in subsequent centuries, in particular in the late Middle Ages and the 19th century.. It is made of bronze, silver and gilt silver, with blue glass beads, a few blue stone cabochons (lapis lazuli.

    Irish shrines & reliquaries of the Middle Ages. Dublin: Country House, in association with the National Museum of Ireland, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Raghnall Ó Floinn; National Museum of Ireland. English Medieval Shrines traces the development of such structures, from the earliest cult activities at saintly tombs in the late Roman empire, through Merovingian Gaul and the Carolingian Empire, via Anglo-Saxon England, to the great shrines of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The greater part of the book is a definitive exploration.

    St Manchan’s shrine is a twelfth-century reliquary. It is an outstanding example of early Irish decorative metal work and the work of a true master craftsman. It was commissioned by High King of Ireland, Turlough O’ Connor and likely manufactured at Clonmacnoise. The annals for state. Gold has been used for religious purposes since the beginning of religion, but the best examples of it can be found in medieval Europe. de Touyl’s Reliquary Shrine, the Stavelot Triptych, and the Reliquary of Sainte Foy, and the Holy Thorn Reliquary are some of the most exquisite examples of this, as they are each reliquaries made of gold for the purpose of being venerated.


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Medieval Reliquary Shrines by Kilian Anheuser Download PDF EPUB FB2

A cumdach or book shrine is an elaborate ornamented box or case used as a reliquary to enshrine books regarded as relics of the saints who had used them in Early Medieval Ireland.

They are normally later than the book they contain, often by several centuries, typically the book comes from the heroic age of Irish monasticism beforeand the surviving cumdachs date from afteralthough it is clear.

The Hardcover of the Medieval Reliquary Shrines and Precious Metalwork: Proceedings of a Conference at the Musée D'art et D'histoire, Geneva, Due to COVID, orders may be delayed.

Thank you for your patience. Drawing on the material culture of the reliquary to illuminate texts ranging from St. Erkenwald to Pearl, and from Chaucer’s Book of the Duchess to the Marian plays of the N-Town cycle, Chaganti describes a wide-ranging ‘poetics of enshrinement’ that oscillates between inscription and performance.

This book moves beyond mere analogy to Cited by: Description. Killian Anheuser & Christine Werner, editors. Medieval Reliquary Shrines and Precious Metalwork.

Archetype Books. Hardcover. Like new with grey cover with grey writing. Irish shrines & reliquaries of the Middle Ages (Irish Treasures) [Ó Floinn, Raghnall] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Irish shrines & reliquaries of the Middle Ages (Irish Treasures)Author: Raghnall Ó Floinn. Book Description. The 23 chapters in this volume explore the material culture of sanctity in Latin Europe and the Mediterranean between c.

and c.with a focus on the ways in which saints and relics were enshrined, celebrated, and displayed. Reliquary cults were particularly important during the Romanesque period, both as a means of affirming or promoting identity and as a conduit.

This type of reliquary is often known as a cumdach, or book shrine. An elaborate ornamented box or case used to hold relics or, more often, manuscript fragments that were considered sacred in some manner. While foramina tomb-shrines continued to be constructed, it was now increasingly common for relics to be housed in a reliquary above a monumental shrine base, moving away from Continental models.

In Chapter Nine, Crook traces the ‘final flowering’ of saints’ cults, noting that the flurry of shrine building that seems to have followed the. Traditionally, crystals on reliquary shrines provided a ‘window’ through which to view the relic itself.

So in this case one might argue that together with preserving the loose leaves of manuscripts associated with Art’s illustrious saintly ancestor, the aim was to enshrine Art’s status, in the years immediately following the English king Richard’s attempts to force the Leinster king. The faithful of humble means might still acquire a souvenir badge at the shrines of saints that called to mind the precious works of art associated with them.

Whether created for a church or for a private individual, medieval reliquaries have been subject to widespread destruction during times of religious and political strife. Those that survive bear precious witness to exceptional artistic creativity inspired.

St Manchan’s shrine is a twelfth-century reliquary. It is an outstanding example of early Irish decorative metal work and the work of a true master craftsman. It was commissioned by High King of Ireland, Turlough O’ Connor and likely manufactured at Clonmacnoise. Medieval Fragments has a terrific, well-illustrated post on book shrines: shrines designed to look like books.

Called a cumdach, the book shrine was a kind of reliquary contains pages from books associated with saints, and occasionally first class relics.

Usually quite small, they served as a portable vessel meant for the preservation of a sacred text that represented a direct connection or. The Reliquary Shrine is an especially complex 14th century container for relics, now in The Cloisters, New York.

It is made from translucent enamel, gilt-silver and paint, and dated to c – Although first mentioned in a convent in Budapest, its style and influences betrays French craftsmanship. Relics & Reliquaries Reliquary from the Shrine of St. Oda The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore. Select the image to zoom.

Like many surviving works of medieval art, these gable-shaped reliquaries are the product of a number of medieval and modern alterations. Get this from a library. Medieval reliquary shrines and precious metalwork: proceedings of a conference at the Musée d'art et d'histoire, Geneva, September = Châsses-reliquaires et orfèvrerie médiévales: actes du colloque au Musee d'art et d'histoire, Genève, septembre [Kilian Anheuser; Christine Werner;].

Get this from a library. Medieval reliquary shrines and precious metalwork: proceedings of a conference at the Musée d'art et d'histoire, Geneva, September = Châsses-reliquaires et orfèvrerie médiévales: actes du colloque au Musee d'art et d'histoire, Genève, septembre [Kilian Anheuser; Christine Werner; Geneva (Switzerland).

The cult of saints is one of the most fascinating manifestations of medieval piety. It was intensely physical; saints were believed to be present in the bodily remains that they had left on earth.

Medieval shrines were created in order to protect these relics and yet to show off their spiritual worth, at the same time allowing pilgrims limited access to them. A Newly Crimsoned Reliquary (The Monastery Murders Book 4) - Kindle edition by Fletcher Crow, Donna.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading A Newly Crimsoned Reliquary (The Monastery Murders Book 4).Reviews:   Eight Irish book-shrines are extant, dating from the early 9th century to (a * designates the ones for which the manuscript still exists): 3.

Lough Kinale Book-Shrine, early 9th century, x 28 x 11 cm; Soiscéal Molaise, early 11th century with late medieval. Attributed to Jean de Touyl, this reliquary shrine was made in Paris, France between and This reliquary is one of only four shrines to have survived, and it was believed to have been bought by Queen Elizabeth of Hungary, as it was recorded in inventories of.

In medieval times, the reliquary of Saint Faith was one of the most famous holy sites in all of Europe. Marija Georgievska. The Abbey of Sainte-Foy in Conques was a stop along the route to the shrine of Saint James at Compostela.

It became a popular place in Southern France because people believed that miracles were happening.A (dare I suggest, inadequate) discussion of medieval Irish belt shrines is left as the last section of the book’s text.

Overbey concludes the smooth flow of her overriding idea of ‘sacral geographies’ by aptly and vividly describing these reliquaries as.- Explore michaeljm's board "Reliquaries, Shrines and Holy Places" on Pinterest.

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